Japanese Miso Glazed Eggplant

This recipe is a simple way to jazz up eggplant. It’s salty, sweet and saucy.

The Chef has created this simplified, cook at home version of his popular dish at Cherry Blossom Tree Japanese Restaurant Mooloolaba – one of their most popular dishes.

You can find all of the ingredients in any supermarket, usually in the Asian section. You can use any miso – red, white, brown, for this recipe.

Serve with rice or noodles, steamed green vegetables, grilled chicken or fish, as part of a delicious Japanese meal.

 

Miso Braised Eggplant
Author: The Nutrition Guru and The Chef
Japanese style eggplant with a delicious Miso sauce
Ingredients
  • 4 tablespoons oil
  • ½ large eggplant
  • 2 tablespoons mirin
  • 2 tablespoons cooking sake
  • 2 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon miso paste
  • 1 tablespoon sesame paste or tahini
  • ½ tablespoon soy sauce or tamari
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 shallot
  • 1 tablespoon sesame seeds
Instructions
  1. To make the sauce, combine the mirin, cooking sake, miso, sesame paste (or tahini), soy, rice vinegar and water in a bowl. Whisk until well combined and set aside.
  2. Cut the eggplant into round, 1 cm thick slices.
  3. On high heat add the oil to a large saucepan. When the oil is hot, add the eggplant and cook until golden brown on each side.
  4. Add the sauce and continue to cook until the sauce thickens and eggplant becomes soft. The sauce should glaze & coat the eggplant when cooked. If the eggplant is not soft & sauce is too thick, then add little more water. Remove from pan and serve in a bowl
  5. Finely slice the green end of the shallot and sprinkle on top of the eggplant, along with the sesame seeds.

 

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profile picThe Nutrition Guru and The Chef are a husband and wife team sharing their passion for food and nutrition by serving up tasty recipes and busting common nutrition myths. Their sensible, no-nonsense approach to health has helped many find a healthy realistic relationship with food and health, without the need for fad diets.